Friday, April 18, 2014

Untitled Drawing #4


T. Renner, "Untitled Drawing #4," 2014, ink on paper, 4" x 6".

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Untitled Drawing #3


T. Renner, "Untitled Drawing #3," 2014, ink on paper, 4" x 6".

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Untitled Drawing #2


T. Renner, "Untitled Drawing #2," 2014, ink on paper, 4" x 6".

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Untitled Drawing #1


T. Renner, "Untitled Drawing #1," 2014, ink on paper, 4" x 6".

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Happy Birthday to David Bowie

Happy Birthday to David Bowie who turns 66 today!


T. Renner, "Weeping Wall," 2010, acrylic on paper, 6" x 4".


T. Renner, "Warszawa," 2010, acrylic on paper, 4" x 6".


T. Renner, "Art Decade," 2010, acrylic on paper, 4" x 6".


T. Renner, "Subterraneans, 2010, acrylic on paper, 4" x 6".

These four paintings were made in response to the four lyric-less pieces on David Bowie's album Low. In 2010, I had been reading Hugo Wilcken's 33 1/3 book on the making of Low and set out to try to capture some of the feeling of the songs.

Monday, November 18, 2013

Untitled


T. Renner, "Untitled," 2010, unknown on paper, 8" x 10".

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Untitled (for Don Van Vliet) #2


T. Renner, "Untitled (for Don Van Vliet) #2," 2008, acrylic on canvas, 20" x 16".

Monday, November 11, 2013

Untitled (for Don Van Vliet)


T. Renner, "Untitled (for Don Van Vliet)," 2008, acrylic on canvas, 20" x 16".

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Halloween


T. Renner, "Halloween," 2013, acrylic on paper, 2" x 2".

Friday, October 25, 2013

Monday, October 21, 2013

Dizzy Gillespie, Sharpie Sketch


T. Renner, "Dizzy Gillespie, Sharpie Sketch," 2008, marker on paper, 8" x 10".

Steve Futterman of Life writes:
John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie, who would have celebrated his 96th birthday on October 21, was the very model of the modern American musical genius: a brilliant instrumentalist and stylistic innovator, he was also an extroverted performer with a wicked sense of humor.

One of the primary creators of bebop in the mid-1940s and an unparalleled trumpeter, Dizzy was a populist who wanted his music to be understood, appreciated and enjoyed. Audiences may have associated him with signature visual clues – the beret and goatee he sported in the 1940s, and the trumpet with the upturned bell he began playing in the 1950s – and adored his onstage clowning and dancing, but anyone with ears could tell how seriously he always took the music. An international star until his death on January 6, 1993 (the same day as Rudolph Nureyev), Gillespie was as fervently respected by fellow musicians, as he was beloved by generations of listeners.

A LIFE spread captured Gillespie in 1948, during bebop’s glory days. Conspicuous in his absence is Charlie Parker, the avatar of bebop, and the man whom Dizzy called “the other side of my heartbeat,” but Gillespie’s vivacious personality was far more palatable to the mainstream. To see this magnificent musician in his youth, ready to convince the world that the music he and his not-yet-understood peers were making was the sound of the future, is still a glorious thing to behold.

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Small X #4


T. Renner, "Small X #4," 2013, acrylic on paper, 6" x 4".

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Small X #3


T. Renner, "Small X #3," 2013, acrylic on paper, 6" x 4".

Friday, October 11, 2013

Small X #2


T. Renner, Small X #2, 2013, acrylic on paper, 6" x 4".

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Small X #1


T. Renner, "Small X #1," 2013, acrylic on paper, 6" x 4".

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Untitled

 
T. Renner, "Untitled," acrylic on photograph, 2008, 5" x 7".

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Man on the Moon



T. Renner, "Man on the Moon," 2012, acrylic on paper, 4" x 6".

From the New York Times, August 25, 2012:
Neil Armstrong, a quiet self-described nerdy engineer who became a global hero when he made “one giant leap for mankind” with a small step on to the moon, died Saturday at age 82.

Mr. Armstrong died after complications from cardiovascular procedures, according to a statement from his family. The statement did not say where he died. He lived in Cincinnati.

Mr. Armstrong commanded the Apollo 11 spacecraft that landed on the moon on July 20, 1969, capping the most daring of the 20th century’s scientific expeditions. His first words after setting foot on the surface are etched in history books and the memories of those who heard them in a live broadcast.

“That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind,” Mr. Armstrong said.

In those first moments on the moon, during the climax of heated space race with the then-Soviet Union, Mr. Armstrong stopped in what he called “a tender moment” and left a patch commemorate NASA astronauts and Soviet cosmonauts who had died in action.

“It was special and memorable but it was only instantaneous because there was work to do,” he told an Australian television interviewer in 2012.

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Gatsby Series


T. Renner, "Gatsby #1 (East Egg)," 2007, acrylic on canvas panel, 8" x 10".


T. Renner, "Gatsby #1," 2003, collage on paper, 4" x 6".


T. Renner, "Gatsby #2 (West Egg)," 2007, acrylic on canvas panel, 8" x 10".


T. Renner, "Gatsby #2," 2003, collage on paper, 4" x 6".

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Another Green World



T. Renner, "Another Green World," 2010, acrylic on wood panel, 10.5" x 10.5".